Rosfelds by the numbers 2.0

It’s been almost 4 years since I’ve posted to my blog on a regular basis. I keep renewing my domain name with the hopes that I would find my voice again and get back to writing. But the words never seem to come. The things that I want to say never seem to have enough importance to write…so it has been silent.
One of my resolutions this year was to write more. My goal was to publish to my blog regularly again. Here we are 3 months into the year and my first post…but it’s better than 4 years.
A lot has happened in the last 4 years so I thought a Rosfeld by the Numbers would be a great way to get started again. We’ve moved twice, bought a house, added two babies and bought some chickens. Here is the link to my last “Numbers” post 5 years ago.
Number of family members : 8 (so far) The next question that usually follows is “How many are you going to have” …As many as we’re blessed with. We believe in Jesus-full thinking. (Oh yeah…we’re still one of *those* families. I’ll share more about our personal convictions on another post).
Number of times we’ve moved since Kerry and I got married in 2001 : 12!
Number of pets : 2 dogs, 20 chickens, 1 turkey, 2 goats, 10 cats
Number of loads of laundry we do per day : at least 4
Loads of dishes : 2 per day
Vehicles owned : 3
Gallons of milk per week : 7-8 (thankful we get much of our milk from the goats)
Monthly grocery budget : $575.00
Meals eaten out : 3-4 per month always fast food, Sunday afternoons. 🙂
Legos : too numerous to count, but lots of sets and at least two rubbermaid tubs full.
Instruments played : 5 (flute, drums, trombone, piano, guitar — The 3 older boys are taking piano lessons from Grandma and Otto is teaching himself to play guitar.
Diapers changed : 12 per day depending on bowel habits. This number has gone down recently due to a certain almost 3 year old deciding to wear “big boy” undies (and pee on trees).
Outfits : 8 per day. We have at least two kids make one change of clothes each day which is why we do 4 loads of laundry each day. 🙂
Computers : 5. My work computer, Kerry’s computer and 2 for school. The last one is one sitting next to the piano ready for target practice.
Cookbooks : 40 at least. I like them for recreational reading.
Floors swept : 4 times per day. That’s our goal anyway…
Vacuuming : 4 times a week. If I can feel dirt on my feet when I walk I know it’s time to vacuum, I have 6 boys there is always dirt on the floor.
Pairs of shoes : 35-40. The range is because we can’t always find both shoes at the same time.
Hours of sleep : Kids : 11-12, those napping get 14, Grown ups 5-6. This time change is going to be miserable.
Hugs and Kisses : More than we can count, but never enough.
It wasn’t the meatiest post, but it’s good to be back.

You can do it!

As the school season gets rolling here I’ve answered a lot of questions about homeschooling. Yes, I school our boys at home, the oldest 4 anyway…Zeb doesn’t know his ABCs yet at 4 months but we’re working on it. (Oh how I wish there was a sarcasm font!)

It seems like lots of people are intrigued by the idea and maybe even toy with it for a time but it often seems as though the conversation ends with the other parent saying one of two things…either she says “I don’t think I could do it, I’m not smart enough!” or “There’s no way I could homeschool…I couldn’t stand my kids for that long!” So here’s what my response is (at least in my head anyway)…
First: We homeschool not to keep the bad influences out or to make our kids academically superior or because we’re afraid of the “real world”. We homeschool because we view it as less about education (although very important) and more about discipleship. We are called to disciple our children at all times and quite frankly when we send them to public school we are allowing someone else to do it. They are often taught values and beliefs that are contrary to our beliefs and the values we believe are important for them to understand before setting off in the “real world” (even in a small school).
Second: I love it. It’s hard absolutely. There are days when I seriously think they might be better off on the big yellow bus going to school because we get frustrated. But the truth is, I know they wouldn’t be. We might have rough days, but the freedom homeschool offers is that we can modify our day, our lesson plans and our teaching methods to meet the needs of each child. Not only that but if all else fails I’ll outsource to dad or someone else who might have a different perspective. Unfortunately, in many public classrooms they just move on because our teachers have a  classroom full of children and can’t individualize the education being delivered. (Not because they don’t want to, but because when teaching 35 other children it’s difficult to stop and make it work for one or two).

So back to my response:
Some day I’m going to flippantly say “Well I can tell that you obviously had someone else teach her to walk/talk/think/eat because look at that execution! I mean there is no way a plain old parent could teach their child to walk with such grace!” Okay not really, but seriously…you’ve taught your child so MANY things in the first few years of life why would you ever think you couldn’t teach him? I mean who better to teach your little one than you? You know how this kid thinks better than anyone. You know that he has a particular affinity for the color blue and that he really likes dinosaurs and has memorized most of their names. So why not use those dinosaurs to teach counting, math, science, spelling or English? When my second son was learning his addition facts we were having a miserable time, and I mean miserable! I would write 3+5 = ? Over and over again, and no matter how many times we “built” it with legos, used fingers, toes or whatever he would struggle to grasp the concept of any addition problem. Finally exasperated I sent him to run outside. He has always been very active and we both needed a break, so I asked him to go run a couple laps around our backyard and off he went singing the whole way around the yard. As he was wrapping it up, I asked him to pick up 3 rocks as quick as he could and put them in a circle I drew on the porch. He dropped three rocks in the circle and I asked him to pick up 5 more and put them in a second circle I drew. As he put them down I said “Now quick! How many rocks do you have?” Without missing a beat he said “8”. So I wrote the numbers above the circles. It was a huge breakthrough for us! I could tailor learning to fit what he needed at that moment. For the record, he no longer has to run laps to add but we used a similar concept to subtraction and multiplication.

I have  a confession to make…I am miserable at English, Grammar to be specific. I kind of hated it in school. A lot. We didn’t diagram sentences until Junior High and I hated every single minute and once you get past the adjective/adverb territory and in to prepositions…I feel totally lost and my guts wrench. This last year we did a program called Shurley English with the boys, it involved diagramming sentences and parts of speech past adjectives. I.Was.Terrified. to teach it to them. I mean, what if I seriously messed up? And I can’t remember squat from when I was in school. So you know what? I learned it all over again with them. I stayed a day ahead with lessons so I was prepared but we did it together. The beauty of the program itself is that it has the little jingles to help remember parts of speech, it has question and answer flows to learn how to diagram  sentences and it makes total sense! Where was this stuff when I was 12?
Some parents think they have to have a Master’s degree in everything to be able to teach their children. First grade teachers are super smart, without a doubt, but few of them have a master’s degree in calculus, literature, history and science. It’s called knowing where to look up the answers and being willing to learn together. So no, I’m not the smartest person around but am I qualified to teach my children? Absolutely! And so are you! And really, when they get old enough for the subjects I know nothing about like say calculus…technology is awesome and they can learn it through a correspondence or online course.

My children do benefit from being accountable to others who may teach them throughout the year, they learn that someone else has expectations too and not just mom. For example, we have a wonderful gal from our church who teaches them art during the week. They have learned that she expects them to sit still and listen too. She gives them instruction and they’re expected to follow those instructions and complete the task. They learn accountability to others. When we lived in Colorado we had a group of homeschool families who got together once or twice a month. The kids might prepare a project to present to the group, write a paper or report to share with someone else. One year I taught a science unit on the human body. I went once a week and taught about a different body system, we did experiments and dissected stuff…it was awesome! I was able to use my in depth knowledge as a nurse and experience to teach the whole group. Another mom put together a music program, while another provided math tutoring. We worked together to give our children the best learning experiences possible. We are still a bit of an oddity here so there aren’t as many homeschooling families, but there are still those experiences out there.

My response to the second statement “I couldn’t stand my kids all day!” is one that gets under my skin more than others. First, they’re your kids! If you can’t stand them then it’s probably a parenting issue. And secondly, if you can’t stand them how do you expect a complete stranger to? I mean really, if your child is so irritating that even you…the one who is supposed to love them unconditionally and all, doesn’t want to be around them…there is more than schooling at issue there and perhaps you should spend some more time around them…training them perhaps and learning to love them.

I do think it’s possible for most parents to homeschool their children. I realize that not every parent feels that conviction (and I don’t expect them to). But don’t NOT homeschool because you don’t think you can, it is possible and YOU CAN DO IT! (Is that grammatically correct? We haven’t made it to that lesson yet…)

Leave and Cleave – Chitter Chatter

We’re at camp this week with the boys so I’m sharing some posts on marriage.
Communication. It’s so vital to the health of a marriage. But it’s often overlooked and taken for granted. Now women by nature are typically talkers. We like to talk out all the options of a scenario and possible outcomes. We like to know what our husband is thinking. We ask questions like “what do you think about…” or “so tell me…” We are whole story people, we want the whole story, little details and all the stuff from beginning to end.
Men on the other hand, typically are short answer kind of folk. Quick to the point. Short story, strictly need to know kind of information.
This can cause some (okay, a lot) of conflict in a marriage. First I have to say this to the ladies…life is not a romantic comedy. Our husbands can’t read our minds and really things rarely play out like they did in “how to lose a guy in 10 days”. Most of the time if you tell them that you’re okay, he believe you. Unless you use that tone that says…”buddy you should know what’s wrong” that strikes fear into his heart. He’ll spend the rest of the day trying to figure out why he’s in the dog house. So don’t expect him to read your mind. Tell him. You love to talk…don’t clam up and expect him to suddenly become telepathic about the stuff that is really important to you.
Guys…your wife wants you to talk to her. She wants you to tell her what you’re thinking and then she wants to verbally process it with you. It’s unnatural for you. I know. But try to give her more than just “it’s okay” or “fine” when she asks you a question. Communicate…it’s one of the ways she knows that you’re paying attention to her, that you care and that you love her.
Here are some general guidelines for communicating with your spouse…
1. Shut your phone off. Don’t facebook, tweet, check your email or otherwise send the message that you’re not really paying attention. (I have been known to try to do all of these while carrying on a conversation with Kerry…it did not go well.)
2. Don’t roll your eyes, sigh, cross your arms etc. Again this says “I don’t really want to be here”.
3. Say something back. Seriously. If you’re listening to someone…say something back to them to let them know that you at least kind of understand what they’re talking about. Even if you say “I have to think about it for a minute”
4. Don’t interrupt. If your spouse can’t read minds…you can’t either. Let them finish their sentence.
5. Be willing to postpone the conversation if you need to. In our house full of 4 boys, we will sometimes have to put our discussion on hold so that we can attend to whatever emergency (diaper change, tantrum, fight or whatever) is at hand. One of our favorite authors has a policy in his house… when mom and dad need time together they tell the kids they’re taking a break. They shut their bedroom door and have time alone to talk, nap or do whatever married couples do when they’re alone. 🙂 The kids know that only in dire emergencies are they allowed to interrupt. Now, this wouldn’t work on our house Our kids are still too young yet, but it’s certainly a great idea.
6. Sometimes silence (gasp!) is okay…for a bit. Other times it means that your spouse has fallen asleep. Silence is helpful to collect your thoughts and formulate a response. But I’m telling you…I only give Kerry about 30 seconds before I start nudging his leg to make sure he’s still awake. Which brings me to my next point…
7. Don’t save big topics (or in some cases any topic) for right before bed. Your husband is tired. Once the lights go out I have about 2 minutes max to say good night to my husband. Now is not the time for me to bring up discipline issues, job conflicts, having another baby (no that’s not an announcement) or whether we should move again. I’ll get irritated that he falls asleep and the poor guy has no idea what hit him when the pillow comes flying across the bed.
8. Keep your personalities in mind. One of the most helpful things we did in our marriage counseling was take  a little questionnaire. To be honest the biggest take away I have from this survey was that our personalities are very different. I typically answer questions with either strongly agree/strongly disagree, while Kerry answers them with agree/disagree or neutral (I’m rarely neutral on anything). Eventhough we answered questions similarly, I almost always picked the strongly option. Early in our marriage this proved to be huge. I tend to get excited and worked up about things quickly. I wanted Kerry to do the same. When he would respond calmly or would take time to think about stuff (this is a great quality as I tend to make pretty snap decisions) I would get irritated and interpret it as lack of caring or that he wasn’t paying attention. Sometimes your spouse might need to take time to let it sink in.
9. Be respectful but be honest. This goes without saying I think, but sometimes it’s helpful to have a reminder. Be nice and tell the truth. 🙂
I would encourage you this week to think about how you speak with and to your spouse. Communication isn’t just about conveying ideas. It’s about connecting. It’s about meeting the needs  of your marriage and building your relationship.

Leave and Cleave Part 2

We’re at camp this week with the boys so I’m sharing some posts on marriage.

 

Genesis 2:23-24 (King James Version)

23And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.

24Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.


I have talked about leaving and why it’s important as a wife, this week I want to talk about the cleave part.

I just kind of thought that cleave meant you just stuck with your man. You were part of him (because you’re one flesh now) so you’re stuck together.

Strong’s Concordance says this “abide fast, cleave fast together, follow close hard after, be joined together. A primitive root; properly, to impinge, i.e. Cling or adhere; figuratively, to catch by pursuit — abide fast, cleave (fast together), follow close (hard after), be joined (together), keep (fast), overtake, pursue hard, stick, take.”

Let’s pick out a few key words there…follow close hard after, cling, adhere, catch by pursuit, pursue hard. Ladies, this means that we don’t just stand by our man, but we continue to pursue him. We continue to cling to him, we work to develop that oneness and that relationship. We’re not just “stuck like glue” (love that song by Sugarland) to our husband. We’re hanging on, we’re continuing to hold fast to him. It is a conscious choice, it requires activity and effort on our part. We’re not just “there” we are an active participant.

Now I have to say this first…cleaving to our husband doesn’t mean that we can’t be apart from him for one second or that we have to do everything together. I think that’s unhealthy. We’re not smothering the guy, we’re not calling every 2 minutes when he’s at work. But it doesn’t mean we do everything separate either. I know couples who take separate vacations, have separate bank accounts, separate schedules and meet up only in passing. They lead separate lives. This is unhealthy too.

It means girls, that we’re not turning to our best friends, the neighbor or co-workers to form the relationships we should be with our husbands. They are a great support system, but they shouldn’t be where we go first. It should be to God and then our husband.

I can hear it already…There are times when a wife feels like she needs to “just vent” and “have a girls night”. Absolutely. I’ve benefitted from those things myself. But ladies I caution you to be careful what you say and think about your husband during those vent sessions. Remember that we are to respect our husbands and bad mouthing him to others isn’t how we show respect. It also opens us up to fostering negative feelings about him and opens the door for infidelity whether physical or emotional. Our marriages should be a work in progress even when we’ve been married 50 years.

When I think of the word cleave, I think of playdoh. Yep. Playdoh. Have you ever mixed two colors of playdoh together? They stick together, they hold fast, they are one. That’s what cleaving to your husband is like. You’re each unique, but you cleave to one another and become one. The other image I have when I think of cleaving is a kid, wrapped around the leg of someone. Holding on with arms and legs for dear life. For some that’s a negative image, so imagine the playdoh if you have to. The point is this…we are active participants when we cleave to our husbands. We are holding on for dear life.

Our cleaving to the man we marry should come second only to our cleaving to Christ and the cross. We should daily cling to, pursue and adhere to our Heavenly Father. He is where we get our strength and sustenance. God is our first priority and in pursuing Him it makes it easier to pursue our husbands.

My challenge for this week: How can you cleave to your husband this week? How can you pursue him, hold fast to him? Is there some way you can get alone time? Is there a project or something he’s been working on that you can compliment him on, what about working with him? Can you do something together? Even if it’s just the dishes or folding that basket of laundry. I encourage you this week to find a way to strengthen your bond with your husband.

How it went and the full story

5/10/12
Warning, this post is a little long, but it seems like I’ve explained this whole thing a hundred times. I’ve decided to just make business cards and hand them out saying “just visit my blog”. I’m only half kidding, but here is the whole story…
Today is over. I am thankful. I slept surprisingly well last night, although I woke up several times, I was able to get back to sleep.
Our appointment was for 9am this morning, I was told to bring a book and be prepared to wait. My initial thought was “there is no way I’m going to be able to concentrate and read anything.” Thankfully they had a TV in the waiting room and I didn’t have to wait as long as expected.
A week ago we had a 12 week sonogram that measures nuchal translucency (the scruff of baby’s neck). It measures the amount of fluid in that little pocket, if the measurement is high it can indicate that baby isn’t able to circulate fluid like it should. Normal is less than 2.5mm, ours measured 6mm, which is pretty significant. It is considered a “soft” marker for chromosome abnormalities or heart defects. I also had lab work drawn with it, which was actually normal, however the blood work combined with the NT measurement doesn’t bring my risk to “normal” yet. So we were referred to maternal fetal medicine for further genetic counseling and testing. That appointment was today.

We met first with the genetic counselor to talk family history (moms, dads, aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents, siblings). We talked about my 3 previous losses, this pregnancy and our understanding of why we were there. She went through our options for testing so fast it made our heads spin, and I’m not sure I could tell you exactly what she said anyway. And I’ll tell you, she could whip out a family pedigree faster than I could draw 2 lines.


Our next step was to see the sonographer to re-measure the NT, look baby over in general and check position of the placenta in case we decided for the CVS (chorionic villus sampling) test. The sonographer was super nice and very calming. He did a really nice job of explaining what he was seeing and what he was looking for. When he first measured the NT, his comment was “I thought the measurement said 6.” I told him it did and asked what it was now. “I’m not getting 6” he said. The measurements he was getting were closer to 4mm, which is still abnormal, but less than last week. I was encouraged when I heard that, even though I know it’s still not “normal”.
There were some other things that looked good for our little one as well. We could clearly see the nasal bone and nose, which is good. Apparently, in baby’s who have Down’s syndrome, it may be difficult to see at 12 weeks. Our baby has also grown half an inch or so in a week, which is reassuring as well.
I didn’t get a good picture of the NT from today, but got a great picture of this little baby’s profile. You can make out nose, lips and chin.


This was the fun part of the morning really. The sonographer said my placenta was in a perfect spot for the CVS and the baby was way on the other side of the apartment, so it *should* be an easy procedure if we decided to do it.
Kerry and I talked about it a bit. I’m an information person, I like to know what I’m dealing with and how it’s going to affect the course of treatment from here forward. The risk to the baby for the CVS is almost the same as the amniocentesis, which is the other option for chromosome studies but can’t be done until 16-18 weeks. We elected for the CVS for a couple of reasons. One is that we’d have the results sooner and the other is that by waiting for the amnio, we cross the time frame when I lost Knox. If the baby would die between now and the time for the amnio, it would be harder to get tissue samples for chromosome studies to determine what *might* have happened. And Kerry said “you’ll be a wreck if you wait another 3 weeks”, I’ve gotta say he’s right too.
The CVS test is where they insert a needle through my abdomen, through the uterus and into placenta. They collect a sample of the chorionic villus (which are the finger-like projections of the placenta into the uterus), that contains virtually the same genetic material as the baby.

They’ll send that sample off and the first results we’ll get back within 48-72 hours, since its Thursday that means we’ll hear on Monday sometime. The initial results will tell us whether our baby has one of the more common chromosome abnormalities. It tests for trisomy 13, 18, 21, and XY (I think that’s all of them). We’ll also be able to tell for sure if this baby is boy or girl. Then in about 2 weeks we’ll have “final” results which maps out other less common chromosome issues. If for some reason (there is a 1% chance) we can’t get results, usually because there are both normal and abnormal cells in the sample, we will have an amniocentesis at 16 weeks.
Even if the chromosome studies are normal, we’re still not considered out of the woods yet. We will go back to maternal fetal medicine for a very detailed sonogram and fetal echocardiogram to look at the structure and function of baby’s heart. Another common problem with babies who have a thick NT is heart defects. That will happen at about 22 weeks, the end of June or beginning of July for us. If that test comes back normal, we’ll be considered “in the clear” in terms of the big stuff.
So that’s all the technical stuff, as for me I’m doing okay. I’m a little sore where the needle went in and am told to expect to be sore for about a week. I have to say from the nursing perspective it was really neat to watch the needle go in and through my abdomen on the screen with the sono. I was given pretty strict instructions to take it easy for the next week. I mean strict…no standing for longer than 30 minutes, no lifting more than 30 lbs and no strenuous activities.  Sheesh, for a whole week? I reminded them I have 4 children, but I’m sure the big guys will help. I’m thankful Kerry was home the rest of today and will be home tomorrow.
It seems like we’ve had so much “bad” news lately (the genetic counselor was very much a worst case scenario kind of person), that we are focusing on the “good” news we’ve had. Things like the baby is growing normally, the NT was less this week and the major structures of the brain are there. We will have an anatomy scan around 20 weeks in the OB office where they’ll check growth again, look at the major body structures to make sure they’re all there and doing what they’re supposed to. I am thankful for the peace I had this morning after we talked to the genetic counselor. God has brought peace that only He can and I so appreciate the prayers that have been said on our behalf. We welcome continued prayers for the rest of this pregnancy and this little baby.
We trust that God has knit this little child together for His glory. We don’t know what lies ahead, but we are trusting that God will guide us through it all. It is difficult to not know what is in front of us, but we know that God does. We pray for wisdom for the doctors caring for us, wisdom and peace as we get results and approach the point in my pregnancy where we lost Knox. I thought this was a neat picture of baby’s hand. It’s so incredible.

 
 

March 5, 2012

As I get prepared for our appointment with maternal fetal medicine tomorrow, I spent some time reading over the prayer I wrote the day I found out we were expecting this little one. I write to get thoughts out and since Kerry was working and we wanted to keep the whole pregnant under wraps for a bit, I had to sit down for 2 minutes to write out my prayer of thanks the afternoon I found out. This is what I wrote thanking God for this precious gift. It was a good reminder today.
3/5/12
My Dear Heavenly Father,
I have to write this down because my mind is racing so much I can’t even focus long enough to say anything more than the words “Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!” Thank you for sending your son to die on the cross for my salvation. Thank you Lord for the blessing of children! And Thank you God for allowing me to be pregnant again. I cannot put into words the joy I’m feeling at this moment.
I am so grateful for this moment it’s hard to describe. I thought I would be more afraid of being pregnant after losing Knox, but I’m anticipating it. I’m excited about the prospect. I pray Lord that you will allow me to carry this baby to term and that you will help him/her to grow and develop normally. I also pray God that you will allow me to have a safe birth at home.
Lord, please guide our steps as we make decisions for my healthcare and as we look to the future of this little one. Lord, please bring about a peace as we embark on this adventure. Please help this pregnancy to glorify you and this child and his/her birth glorify you and the grace that you give. God I thank you so much for the precious blessing you have bestowed on our family. Please help us to be good stewards of the gifts You provide for us and to always trust You.
Thank you. I praise You Lord for Your provision and Your grace and Your love for me. Thank you God for the blessing of another child.
In Jesus’ precious name,
Amen.
 

2 Week Menu rotation 2

I plan our meals 2 weeks at a time. I shared our rotation 1 here.
I forgot to say in my initial post that often times, I won’t make a couple of the meals on the list because we have more left overs than I had planned or because we have an unexpected “family date night” and I don’t have to cook dinner that night. Since I’ve already purchased the ingredients for the meal, depending on how perishable it is, I’ll either save it for the following time the meal is used or I’ll switch it out for another one later. In other words, I’m not legalistic about my menu. Just cause it’s listed doesn’t mean we have to eat it.
I’ll paste the menu below, but I’ll also share a link in case you can’t see the whole thing.

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Cubed steak, potatoes and gravy Crockpot scalloped potatoes and ham Crockpot tortellini Church (we alternate bringing meals with another family from our church on Wednesday night) Left overs (every family has to have a left over night). J Breakfast casserole (I often use hamburger) Verenika or bierock casserole
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Pizza and salad Leftovers Tacos, corn Church Easy beef stroganoff Grilled chicken, green beans and salad Chicken fajitas or grilled chicken salad

 
 
See the menu here

Thoughtful Thursday — Now THAT is serving

So last night I had an experience with a mother’s nightmare (okay, major embarrassment). My son got sick at Wednesday night church, on the floor in front of everyone. After I made him eat his supper. I felt terrible. I was embarrassed for my son and I was dreading the clean up.

Kerry came to get me to let me know our son was sick. Here’s the kicker though, when I went to go clean up the “getting sick” part, one of our highschoolers from Journey was cleaning up after our son. I told her I would be happy to clean it up and that she didn’t have to. She said “I know you can, but I am happy to help.” She cheerfully helped clean up after my son.
Her grace in that situation astounded me. It’s one thing to clean up after your own child, but completely different to clean up after someone else’s. Not only that, but she is in highschool. There aren’t many highschool aged girls who would willingly jump in and clean up after a kiddo has been sick on the floor. It’s gross for anyone, but I was thoroughly impressed with her behavior and her willingness to serve our family.

Words could not express my gratitude or the humbleness I felt at her attitude. We try to teach our boys to serve others and serve their siblings through character training and giving them practice in service. I don’t think any lesson could have been driven home more than the one that was demonstrated last night to our family.